Houston Holi in Colors

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Houston Holi in Colors

“If you’re in Houston, you’re more likely not to date someone that is from your same ethnicity.” a Houston local proudly said. A melting pot of cultures, many schools in Houston are a mash-up of people, with a range of traditions.

Newcomers have long been part of the Houston story, a city of migrants from across the U.S. that later became a city of immigrants — and their children. As the third most diverse city in the U.S., Houston sets an example for a diverse and fluid lifestyle. Immigrants started flowing into the city in 1982 following the end of the oil boom that decreased prices in housing. Asians represent a quarter of the total foreign-born with 410,000, many of whom come from India.  Around the end of March and beginning of spring, Houston Holi boasts the “biggest Festival of Colors in the U.S.” and locals celebrated with dancing, Indian street food vendors, concerts, and colors.

Holi was celebrated March 20-21 but it is celebrated throughout spring. A holiday most famously known as the Festival of Color, Holi is all about new beginnings. Historically, it began as a ceremony for married women to bestow well-being and prosperity on their new family and married life. On the first night, bonfires are lit to symbolize the death of Holika, the Hindu legend’s demon king. The following day, Hindus take to the streets throwing color powders and dancing. The four main colors – red, blue, green and yellow- are symbolic in Hinduism. Red reflects love and fertility, blue symbolizes determination, green represents life and happiness and yellow signifies knowledge. Other cities like Houston with a large Indian community will be celebrating in the upcoming days as well. March 30 and 31, Spanish Fork, Utah will host its annual Holi celebration of 70,000 people based at the local Krishna temple. On the east coast, New JerseyNew York, and Boston are all having Holi celebrations, all within the last week of March and first week of April.